The Parties Platform

Here’s the platform for each party for the major issues facing Canadian voters.

Last updated: September 10, 2021

COVID19 Pandemic

Liberal Party

Recovery

The Liberals spent billions on pandemic aid during the crisis in the form of relief benefits and wage subsidies. They will extend the emergency wage subsidy to October and the Canada recovery hiring program to March 31. They have pledged to help the hard-hit tourism industry with a temporary wage and rent support for up to 75 per cent of expenses. In April, the government and Air Canada agreed to a $5.9 billion loan package.

Mandatory vaccines

The Liberals announced before the election call that the government would make COVID-19 vaccines mandatory for federal public service employees this fall, as well as some workers in federally regulated industries, including airlines and railways. Commercial air travellers and passengers on interprovincial trains and large marine vessels with overnight accommodations will also have to be vaccinated. They are promising to spend $1 billion to help provinces and territories bring in proof-of-vaccination credentials in their jurisdictions for non-essential businesses and public spaces.

Conservative

Recovery

Conservatives have said they will wind down emergency spending in a responsible way and help the hardest-hit sectors with a “Canada jobs surge plan,” paying up to 50 per cent of the salaries of new hires after the wage subsidy expires. They promise loans of up to $200,000 for small and medium businesses in the retail, hospitality and tourism sectors, of which 25 per cent could be forgivable. Tories pledge to help the airline sector rebuild.

Mandatory vaccines

Conservatives would not demand that federal civil servants and travellers are vaccinated against COVID-19. Instead, unvaccinated public servants would need to pass a daily rapid test. Canadian travellers would also need to pass a rapid test or present a recent negative test result before boarding a plane, train, bus or ship.

New Democrat Party

Recovery

New Democrats have claimed credit for pushing Liberals to make emergency economic aid programs more generous during the pandemic. They promise to extend wage and rent subsidies for small businesses and “dedicated support” to help the hard-hit tourism sector rebound.

Mandatory vaccines

The NDP supports mandatory vaccinations for federal public servants and workers in federally regulated industries. During the campaign, it called for a mandatory vaccine policy and domestic vaccine passports to be in place by Labour Day.

Green Party

Recovery

The Greens say they will create green jobs for those who have been “severely affected.” The party’s platform also pledges to extend wage and rent subsidies until COVID-19 restrictions are fully lifted.

Mandatory vaccines

Green Party Leader Annamie Paul has said she wants to see more details on the government’s plan on mandatory vaccines and how it would deal with those who refuse a shot for medical or religious reasons. She criticized the Liberals for having hastily announced the policy before the campaign

People Party

Recovery

The People’s Party criticized Liberal spending during the COVID crisis that had the support of other parties. The People’s Party says it would “phase out all COVID spending programs and reverse new spending programs announced by the Trudeau government.” It pledges to eliminate all corporate subsidies. The party says it supports emergency provincial measures to protect the most vulnerable, but opposes “bailing out provinces that impose economically destructive lockdowns.”

Mandatory vaccines

The People’s Party platform says it opposes vaccine mandates and regular testing for federal civil servants and those working in federally regulated industries. It would repeal vaccine passports for travellers, oppose similar measures imposed by provinces and “support individuals and groups that challenge such measures in court.”

Bloc Québécois

Recovery

The Bloc has not yet unveiled its policies on this matter.

Mandatory vaccines

The Bloc supports people getting vaccinated but has questioned the constitutionality of the government’s policy on mandatory vaccinations.

Childcare

Liberal Party

The Liberals are investing $30 billion over five years for a national child-care system, a key part of the spring budget. They’ve signed multi-billion-dollar deals with eight provinces and territories to cut fees to an average of $10 per day in five years. Liberals say they want to see a 50 per cent reduction in average fees for early learning and child care by the end of 2022. The plan also pumps $2.5 billion into Indigenous early learning and child care.

Conservative

Conservatives would cancel the Liberal program but allow provinces and territories that inked deals to keep the funds already paid out. The Tory plan would convert the existing child-care expense deduction into a refundable tax credit to cover up to 75 per cent of child-care costs for lower-income families. They say a family with an income of $30,000 would get up to $6,000 a year, while a family with an income of $50,000 would get $5,200

New Democrat Party

The NDP also wants a national, universal, $10-per-day child-care program. The party is also pledging funding to create more child-care spaces across the country “so families don’t spend months on wait lists” and to ensure child-care workers are paid a “fair, living wage.” The NDP has not provided details of how the plan would work.

Bloc Québécois

The Bloc has touted Quebec’s existing child-care program and has raised concerns about Ottawa dictating to the provinces on the issue. They called for funding to be transferred to Quebec with “no strings attached.”  (The $6-billion over five years that the federal government announced for Quebec in August comes without conditions.)

Green Party

The Green party is vowing to create a universal and affordable early learning and child-care system, but doesn’t say how much it will spend to do that. The party also says it will make parental leave more flexible and better paid, and open it to those who have had a miscarriage or need to care for an elderly family member.

People Party

The People’s Party platform does not include any proposals for child care.

The Economy

Liberal Party

Economy & Affordability

The Liberals increased the federal minimum wage to $15 and say they would enhance the Canada Workers Benefit to support about one million more Canadians in low-wage jobs. They promise to create the Canada Disability Benefit, a direct monthly payment for low-income Canadians with disabilities between the ages of 18-64. Though the idea is popular among some grassroots party members, Liberals have not committed to a universal basic income.

Liberals pledged in last September’s throne speech and the spring budget to create one million jobs. In their election platform, they promise to go “beyond” one million jobs. They’ve proposed to extend the Canada Recovery Hiring Program to March 31 and provide the hard-hit tourism industry with temporary wage and rent support of up to 75 per cent to see them through the winter. They promise to extend COVID-related insurance coverage for media stoppages to support 150,000 jobs.

Small Business

Liberals have promised to extend the Canada Recovery Hiring Program until March to help small employers make new hires. The program covers 50 per cent of the wages of new employees, but that will decrease to 20 per cent in November and that is the rate at which the program will be extended into March. Liberals are promising a refundable tax credit for small businesses to help cover 25 per cent of the costs of eligible ventilation upgrades, up to $10,000 per building and with a maximum of $50,000 per company. They promise to boost the Canada Small Business Financing Program to increase the maximum loan amount to $500,000 from $350,000.

Deficits and Debts

Estimate that the cost of the Liberal election promises will use roughly half of the five percentage point drop in the projected debt-to-GDP ratio in the federal budget released in April.

 

Housing

The Liberals introduced a 10-year, $40-billion National Housing Strategy in 2017 to build 100,000 affordable housing units and cut homelessness. The spring budget included $2.5 billion to create 35,000 affordable housing units. During the campaign they have promised to build, preserve or repair 1.4 million homes in four years, double the first-time home buyers tax credit from $5,000 to $10,000, and force the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation to cut mortgage insurance rates by 25 per cent. Liberals are also promising $1 billion in funding for a rent-to-own program, a Home Buyers’ Bill of Rights to ban blind bidding, and a first home savings account to allow Canadians up to age 40 to save up to $40,000 for their first home and withdraw it tax-free when it’s time to buy. They also want to ban foreign ownership of new homes for the next two years.

Conservative

Economy & Affordability

Conservatives say they will double the disability supplement in the Canada Workers Benefit from $713 to $1,500, and make it easier to qualify for the Disability Tax Credit and Registered Disability Savings Plan. The Tory platform also says the party would double the Canada Workers Benefit up to a maximum of $2,800 for individuals or $5,000 for families. Tories do not support universal basic income.

The Conservatives are also committed to creating one million jobs, if elected. Their platform includes a “Canada Job Surge Plan” to pay up to 50 per cent of the salary of new hires for six months once the emergency wage subsidy is phased out, and promise to provide loans of up to $200,000 for small and medium businesses in the hospitality, retail and tourism sectors. They are also promising to double the Canada Workers Benefit.

Small Business

The Conservative platform includes a “Rebuild Main Street Tax Credit” to provide a 25 per cent tax credit on amounts up to $100,000 that Canadians personally invest in a small business over the next two years. They also are promising loans of up to $200,000 for small- and medium-sized businesses in retail, hospitality and tourism, with up to 25 per cent forgiven. The party wants to provide a five per cent “investment tax credit for any capital investment made in 2022 and 2023,” with the first $25,000 to be refundable for small business. The Conservatives say a promised one-month “GST holiday” in December would help small retail stores, and want to provide a 50 per cent rebate for food and non-alcoholic beverages purchased for dine-in from Monday to Wednesday for one month.

Deficits and Debts

“Adopt a responsible and measured approach to balance the budget over the next decade” (source)


Use promises in the party platform to “reduce the deficit by almost 90 per cent by repairing the economy.”

Housing

The Conservatives have promised to build one million homes over three years, launch an Indigenous housing strategy and convert 15 per cent of federal government property into housing. They want to ban foreign investors not living in or moving to Canada from buying homes in Canada for a two-year period. They say they will “encourage a new market” in seven-to-10-year mortgages and tweak the stress test and insurance requirements to help more Canadians qualify for financing.

 

New Democrat Party

Economy & Affordability

The NDP says it would increase the $15 federal minimum wage to $20 and immediately deliver a new disability benefit. New Democrats have said they would make the “creation of a guaranteed livable basic income” a priority in order to strengthen Canada’s social safety net.

The NDP is also pledging to create one million new jobs in its first mandate with “bold investments” in transit, community infrastructure, affordable housing, energy-efficient retrofits and more.

Small Business

The NDP promises that wage and rent subsidies would continue under their government until small businesses can fully reopen and say they would put in place a hiring bonus to pay the employer portion of EI and CPP for new or rehired staff. They say they would cap credit card merchant fees at a maximum of one per cent and help “streamline access to government export services” to help small businesses find new markets.

Deficits and Debts

  • Ensure Canada’s long-term finances are fiscally sustainable according to the Parliamentary Budget Officer’s fiscal sustainability measures. (source)
  •  
  • Broadly, the party says its platform and spending commitments will be financed by reforming the tax system so that big corporations and wealth individuals pay more.

Housing

The NDP says it will build, renovate, and preserve 1.7 million homes over the next four years and force the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation to cut mortgage insurance rates by 25 per cent. The NDP is committed to building 500,000 affordable homes over the next decade and has proposed the creation of 30-year mortgages insured by the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation. The party wants a 20 per cent foreign buyer’s tax on purchases of residential property to foreign corporations and individuals who are not citizens or permanent residents. It’s promising a $5,000 rental subsidy for those struggling to make rent and would also double the first-time home buyers’ tax credit.

 

Bloc Québécois

Economy & Affordability

The Bloc supported raising the federal minimum wage. The party does not appear to have a position on the issue of universal basic income.

The Bloc has called for a study of the impact of bankruptcies on small and medium-sized businesses and is pushing for reforms to employment insurance to better support all workers, including seasonal and gig workers.

Small Business

The Bloc is committed to pushing for more government assistance for small businesses, including those in Quebec’s tourism and hospitality sector badly hurt by the pandemic. The party is also promoting a strategy to support local purchasing and help small businesses make the digital shift. They want to cap transaction fees from credit card issuers.

Deficits and Debts

 

Housing

The Bloc is calling for Ottawa to devote one per cent of its annual income to social, community and affordable housing. It wants surplus federal properties to be used for the development of these homes, with money from the national housing strategy to help co-ops buy buildings and convert them into affordable housing.

 

Green Party

Economy & Affordability

Greens have long been committed to a guaranteed livable income, arguing the Canada Emergency Response Benefit could have been converted to meet those ends. Greens say they also want to establish a “fair, national minimum wage.”

The Greens have promised a “just transition” to retrain workers in the oil and gas industry for the “green economy of the future.” If Canada acts now, the platform says, the country can be a leader in “cleantech” and renewable energy jobs. “It’s where the jobs of the future are,” the document states.

Small Business

The Green Party platform pledges to hold the small business tax rate at no more than nine per cent. To support environmentally friendly small business startups, the Greens propose creating a Green Venture Capital Fund of $1 billion. The Greens promise financial support for businesses that want to adopt clean technologies. They promise to promote entrepreneurship training, with a focus on women, young, racialized and Indigenous entrepreneurs. The Greens also pledge to reduce paperwork, red tape and bureaucracy and to ensure all new legislation considers the impact on small businesses.

Deficits and Debts

 

Housing

The Greens want an “empty home tax” on foreign and corporate residential property owners who leave units vacant and to strengthen regulation of foreign investment in residential real estate. The Greens promise to allocate one per cent of GST to housing and other municipal infrastructure to provide a consistent baseline of funding.

 

People Party

Economy & Affordability

The People’s Party seeks to phase out COVID support programs and reverse spending programs brought in by the Liberal government. The party contends that the Liberals “exploited the COVID crisis” to create a host of expensive new programs.

The People’s Party says it can produce higher-paying jobs and tackle workplace shortages in many sectors by lowering taxes for all businesses. They promise to cut the corporate income tax rate to 10 per cent from 15 per cent over the course of one mandate.

Small Business

While the party has no specific proposals for small businesses, it argues that cutting taxes would benefit all businesses. The party also wants to remove interprovincial trade barriers to help small businesses get goods such as alcohol and agricultural produce across provincial boundaries.

Deficits and Debts

The People’s Party platform makes no mention of debts. 

Housing

The People’s Party platform makes no mention of housing.

Climate Change

Liberal Party

The Liberals claim that with a national price on carbon (rising to $170 per tonne by 2030) and other measures, they can cut Canada’s greenhouse gas emissions by 40 to 45 per cent below 2005 levels by 2030. They pledged previously to cut emissions 30 per cent by that date. The Liberals passed a climate plan, C-12, to set legally binding emissions targets to reach net-zero emissions in 2050. They have pledged to ensure the oil and gas sector cuts emissions at the pace required to hit net-zero in 2050, with five-year targets. The party says it will ban single-use plastics by 2030.

Green Energy

The Liberal budget promised $5 billion more over seven years (on top of $3 billion already announced) for the “net zero accelerator” fund for big emitters to invest in clean technology to reduce emissions. Liberals say they want all new cars and light-duty trucks sold in Canada by 2035 to be zero-emission. The federal budget proposed a 50 per cent cut in general tax rates for corporations and small businesses making zero-emissions technologies and a $4.4 billion plan to retrofit residential buildings.

Conservative

The Conservatives opposed the Liberals’ net-zero emissions legislation and say their climate plan will meet Paris climate commitments of 30 per cent below 2005 levels by 2030. They would replace the Liberal carbon pricing system with one that includes a price on carbon for consumers that will rise to a maximum of $50 per tonne.

Instead of the rebates offered under the Liberal system, however, the money collected through the Conservative carbon pricing scheme would be diverted to “personal low carbon savings accounts” to be used by individuals to buy “green” products. The party wants to keep in place the current output-based pricing system on larger industrial emitters. Conservatives plan to invest in carbon capture and tax products imported from countries with low climate standards.

Green Energy

The Tories pledge to develop a national clean energy strategy, to create and expand smart grids and to develop “new clean energy technology such as nuclear, hydrogen and renewables.” The party wants 30 per cent of light duty vehicles sold in Canada to be zero emissions by 2030, and is promising to invest a billion dollars in electric vehicle manufacturing.

New Democrat Party

New Democrats supported the Liberals’ net-zero legislation and have set an emissions reduction target of 50 per cent below 2005 levels by 2030. They pledge to eliminate fossil fuel subsidies and target net-zero electricity by 2030, with a goal of moving to 100 per cent non-emitting electricity by 2040.

Green Energy

New Democrats say they will set a target to see the country powered by net-zero electricity by 2030, with a goal of 100 per cent non-emitting electricity by 2040. The party also pledges to pursue the goal of electrifying public transit and municipal fleets by 2030. The NDP is pledging investments for home and building retrofits, renewable energy and clean transportation.

Bloc Québécois

The Bloc Québécois says it wants to meet and exceed the Paris climate agreement targets, redirect unspent money on the Trans Mountain pipeline to renewable projects, and compel provinces that have emissions higher than the national average to pay into a “green equalization” fund to be distributed to provinces polluting less. The party’s platform proposes to subject all federal policies and public contracts to a “climate test.”

Green Energy

The Bloc is calling for the complete abolition of fossil fuel subsidies and proposes to redirect them towards clean energy projects. The party wants to electrify the entire federal fleet and demands that Ottawa slash Canada’s hydrogen strategy.

Green Party

While they criticized the government’s net-zero bill, Green MPs ultimately voted for it. The party wants to slash greenhouse gas emissions by 60 per cent below 2005 levels by 2030 (using an annual carbon tax increase of $25 a year) and says it will create “clear” and “enforceable” targets and timelines by 2023. If elected, the party would cancel pipeline projects, ban fracking and slap tariffs on imports from countries with weak climate policies. It would also eliminate subsidies for the fossil fuel sector and require federal public investment funds to divest from that industry. They promise a detailed carbon budget to keep GHG emissions within the 1.5 degrees Celsius threshold and say they want to name an all-party climate cabinet.

Green Energy

The Greens want 100 per cent of Canadian electricity to be drawn from renewable sources by 2030. They want to invest in a national electricity corridor, using money saved by cancelling the Trans Mountain pipeline. The party’s platform says it will “Accelerate Canada’s move towards a net-zero emissions green economy in order to help limit further global warming and the intensification of extreme weather and climate events that such warming will provoke.”

People Party

The People’s Party platform argues that there is “no scientific consensus” that human activity is driving climate change and has said warnings of looming environmental catastrophe are exaggerated. The party would withdraw Canada from the Paris climate accord and abandon what it calls “unrealistic” targets to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. They would scrap the Liberal carbon pricing regime and leave it to provinces to adopt programs as they see fit. The party pledges to invest in adaptation strategies as a result of “any natural climate change.”

Green Energy

The People’s Party would abolish subsidies for green technology and “let private players develop profitable and efficient alternatives.” They also pledge to “stop sending billions of dollars to developing countries to help them reduce their emissions.”

Healthcare

Liberal Party

Healthcare

The Liberals rejected the provinces’ request to increase federal health-care spending by $28 billion a year. They have, however, offered $10 billion in new funding for the 2021-22 budget year, with $4 billion of that already announced in the federal budget. In total $6 billion would be used to cut waitlists for treatment and $3.2 billion would be used to hire 7,500 doctors and nurses, with the rest going towards virtual care improvements and rural health care. The Liberals have also promised $4.5 billion over five years to the provinces for mental health services and to move forward on a national, universal pharmacare program.

Long-Term Care

The Liberals are promising to introduce legislation, the Safe Long-Term Care Act, that would set national standards. The Liberals have also promised $9 billion in funding over five years to improve wages for care workers and hire 50,000 new ones. They would also double the Home Accessibility Tax Credit, improve the quality and access to long-term care beds and increase federal inspections for infection prevention. Only about two thirds of this money is new, with $3 billion having already been announced in the budget. Some extra money is already flowing to provinces through the $1 billion Safe Long-term Care Fund announced in the fall economic update.

Seniors

The Liberal budget included a 10 per cent increase to Old Age Security benefits for pensioners 75 or older, starting next July. In August, the government provided a one-time payment of $500 to OAS pensioners who will be 75 or older as of June 30, 2022. Liberals are now promising to spend $9 billion over five years for seniors and to permanently increase the Guaranteed Income Supplement by $500 annually for single seniors and $750 for senior couples over 65.

Conservative

Healthcare

Within the first 100 days of forming a government, the Tories say they would meet with premiers to strike a new health-care agreement. They pledge to boost the annual growth rate of the Canada Health Transfer to six per cent [it’s now tied to how much the economy grows in a given year, with a floor of three per cent]. The party says the increase would inject an additional $60 billion into the health-care system over 10 years and will help fund mental health services. Conservatives also promise $325 million for drug treatment beds and recovery centres. The platform makes no mention of pharmacare.

Long-Term Care

he Conservatives oppose national standards for long-term care but say they will establish a set of “best practices” that the party would encourage provinces to adopt as law. They are also promising $3 billion over three years to upgrade facilities. They also pledge to introduce a Canada Seniors Care Benefit that would pay $200 per month per household to people living with and caring for a parent over age 70. They also want to amend the Home Accessibility Tax Credit, increasing the limit from $10,000 per dwelling to $10,000 per person, and promise to boost staffing numbers through immigration incentives.

Seniors

The Conservatives are promising a Canada Seniors Care Benefit paying $200 per month, per household, to any Canadian living with and taking care of a parent over the age of 70. They would also allow seniors or their caregivers to claim the Medical Expense Tax Credit for home care.

New Democrat Party

Healthcare

The NDP is promising to bring in universal pharmacare by 2022 at a cost of $10 billion annually. The party also says it will immediately bring in dental care for those without insurance and would work towards implementing universal dental care. The NDP is also promising a long-term plan to implement ear care, eye care and fertility treatment. The party is promising better access to mental health and addictions support and to improve access to palliative care. To help pay for these measures, the NDP is pitching a super-wealth tax of one per cent tax on households with wealth of more than $10 million.

Long-Term Care

The NDP wants to end private, for-profit long-term care. To do this, the party vows to set minimum standards and regulate the industry in the same way the Canada Health Act ensures quality health care in Canada; it remains unclear if this would require new legislation. The party says that it would work to improve working conditions for long-term care workers by protecting them from violence and providing better wages and stable employment.

Seniors

The NDP is promising a National Seniors Strategy, which would include a funded dementia strategy and a plan to prevent elder abuse. They promise to make the Canada Caregiver Tax Credit refundable and say their plan for universal pharmacare and dental care will save seniors hundreds of dollars a year.

Bloc Québécois

Healthcare

The Bloc has called on the federal government to increase its share of health-care funding to 35 per cent of its cost from the 22 per cent it currently sends to the provinces. The party is also calling for a Canadian pharmaceutical strategy to facilitate access to drugs at reduced costs.

Long-Term Care

The Bloc vigorously opposes national standards in long-term care, seeing it as an unacceptable encroachment on provincial jurisdiction.

Seniors

The Bloc wants the Old Age Security benefit boosted by $110 a month for those aged 65 and up. They also blasted the Liberals for not having provided the one-time $500 payment to seniors under the age of 75, calling it “unacceptable discrimination.”

Green Party

Healthcare

The Green Party says it wants to boost funding for mental health services that have been under stress during the pandemic and create a national mental health and suicide prevention strategy. The party also wants the care of seniors to be brought under the Canada Health Act and for long-term care to be publicly funded or not-for-profit. The party also wants to introduce a universal pharmacare program and provide better funding for dementia care.

Long-Term Care

The Greens want long-term care to be brought into the Canada Health Act and to eliminate the for-profit model. The party is also promising stricter enforcement of national health-care standards, including the potential of criminal prosecution for those found to be breaking rules. They also want working conditions improved so care workers get paid sick leave and improved training. They also say they want to improve care in the community to allow more seniors to be cared for at home.

Seniors

Greens proposed creating a national seniors strategy, including a dementia strategy, in the 2019 election. In their party platform, they promise to create a “dedicated seniors’ care transfer” that provinces and territories can use to improve conditions for seniors that is separate from the federal health transfers.

People Party

Healthcare

The People’s Party stresses that health care is a matter of provincial jurisdiction and says it wants Ottawa to “stop meddling” in the issue. It would replace the Canada Health Transfer payments with a permanent transfer of tax points of equivalent value to provinces and territories, with a temporary program to compensate those provinces that receive less revenue than they had through transfer payments. The party platform says it is up to provinces to implement any reforms to introduce mixed private-public health care while guaranteeing equal access.

Long-Term Care

The People’s Party argues that its proposed reforms to health care, which would put the onus on provinces and territories to implement reforms, would help Canada’s aging population. The party’s platform does not include specific measures on long-term care.

Seniors

The People’s Party platform does not include specific proposals for seniors, but says its proposed health care reforms would help Canada’s aging populations.

Crime & Racial Inequality

Liberal Party

Guns

Liberals passed Bill C-71 in 2019 to enhance background checks for firearms purchases and force retailers to keep records of sales. In 2020, the Liberal government immediately banned the use, sale and importation of 1,500 makes and models of what they dubbed military-grade “assault-style” firearms. Liberals are promising to make it mandatory for owners of barred firearms to sell them back to the government or have them rendered inoperable. They promise to “crack down on high-capacity magazines,” boost penalties for gun trafficking and smuggling, and spend $1 billion to help provinces and territories ban handguns in their jurisdictions.

Racial inequality

The Liberal government launched a $291.3 million Black Entrepreneurship Loan Fund last September, offering loans of up to $250,000 to businesses that are majority Black-owned, though some have found the funds difficult to access. The Liberals’ spring budget included $200 million for Employment and Social Development Canada to establish a Black-led philanthropic endowment fund to improve social and economic outcomes in Black communities and combat anti-Black racism. It also earmarked $100 million for the Supporting Black Canadian Communities Initiative, which supports Black-led non-profit organizations, and $172 million over five years for Statistics Canada to enact an action plan to improve the collection of disaggregated, race-based data. The Liberals promise a national action plan on combating hate by 2022 as part of a broader anti-racism strategy, and a “Black Canadians justice strategy” to address anti-Black racism in the justice system. 

 

Conservative

Guns

Conservatives have vowed to repeal C-71 and the Liberal order-in-council on outlawing 1,500 firearms. Tory Leader Erin O’Toole reversed course on the campaign trail and said a Tory government would keep in place the firearms ban, while conducting a public review of the classification system. They plan to introduce a simplified classification system and new safe storage provisions, and to target gun smugglers with more support for the RCMP and CBSA. Tories say they would go after criminals and respect law-abiding gun owners and are proposing some new mandatory minimum sentences for the criminal use of guns.

Racial inequality
 

The Conservative platform does not spell out specific proposals to fight racial inequality, nor does it include the word “racism.” The document does say it is “time for Conservatives to take inequality seriously” and vows the party will appoint “Canada’s first Muslim Ambassador and first Ambassador to the Organization of Islamic Cooperation.” Tories are also promising to double funding for the Security Infrastructure Program to address a rise in hate crimes.

New Democrat Party

Guns

The NDP pledges to work to address rising gun crime, keep illegal handguns and assault firearms off the streets, and tackle organized crime and gun smuggling.

Racial inequality

The NDP is promising a national action plan to dismantle far-right extremist organizations and take on white supremacists and neo-Nazi groups. The NDP says it would ban carding by the RCMP and push for all major cities to have dedicated hate crime units with local police forces. The party says it would launch a national task force to address the overrepresentation of Indigenous peoples and Black Canadians in the federal prison population and “conduct a comprehensive review of the existing employment equity regime to close the racialized wage gap.” The NDP says it would convene a national working group to counter online hate and prioritize the “collection of race-based data on health, employment, policing and more.” 

Bloc Québécois

Guns

The Bloc has argued the Liberals’ buy-back program for so-called assault-style firearms should be mandatory. The party also wants Quebec to have its own buy-back program.

Racial inequality

The Bloc platform calls for the federal government to use anonymous resumes in the federal public service to address hiring discrimination. 

Green Party

Guns

Greens support bans on assault firearms and handguns. In the last election, the party supported a confidential buy-back program for assault firearms and handguns.

Racial inequality

Creating a “just society” is one of three main pillars of the Green Party platform. To confront systemic racism in federal public service, the party promises more time and resources for an ongoing review into the Employment Equity Act, a law meant to prevent discrimination in federally-regulated workplaces.The Green platform also calls for expanding the law to cover private businesses, such as temporary agencies, that do work for the federal government. The Greens would tackle systemic racism in policing with a comprehensive review of the RCMP aimed at identifying ways to “detask” and reallocate funds from policing to community and social supports. The party would create a new independent police oversight system, and a national database of police use-of-force incidents. To take on identity-based hate, the Greens would promote unity, condemn extremist ideologies and fund data collection on the spread of online hate and real-world violence. 

People Party

Guns

The People’s Party would scrap the Firearms Act and replace it with legislation to “prioritize” measures to improve public safety. They would replace the current licensing system with a lifetime certification system for firearms owners with mandatory vetting and safety training. They would legalize “simple possession of firearms for certified Canadians.” The party would require that all firearms categories be based on function, “not on looks or arbitrary political whims” and remove what it calls ineffective restrictions on target sport shooters. They would also demand that all future changes to gun regulation be done through Parliament, not decisions by cabinet or the RCMP.

Racial inequality

The People’s Party has no specific measures on racial inequality. It has criticized Canada’s approach to multiculturalism, arguing that it is based on an idea that Canada has “no distinct … identity.” The party would repeal the Multiculturalism Act, end funding to promote multiculturalism and focus on the “integration of immigrants.” It would lower the annual number of immigrants welcomed to Canada to 100,000-150,000, instead of the targeted 350,000, and assess potential immigrants on whether they “align with Canadian values and societal norms.”

Indigenous & Reconciliation

Liberal Party

Indigenous services

The Liberals did not fulfil a promise to lift all long-term boil-water advisories in First Nations by March 2021, but poured $1.5 billion more last year into completing the project. Their spring budget promised $18 billion over five years to improve the quality of life for people in Indigenous communities through things like education and health care. They are promising to spend an additional $1.4 billion over five years for a mental health and wellness strategy to be developed with Indigenous communities.

Reconciliation

Liberals passed legislation to make Sept. 30 a federal statutory holiday — the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation — and changed the citizenship oath to recognize Indigenous rights. They recently provided $320 million in new funding to help Indigenous communities search burial sites at former residential schools and help survivors with trauma. Liberals previously promised to enact all 94 calls to action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC). They say they would build a monument in Ottawa to honour residential school survivors.
 

Conservative

Indigenous services

Conservatives say they will recognize safe drinking water as a fundamental human right and end all long-term drinking water advisories on reserves. They pledge to increase economic partnerships with First Nations communities and to provide $1 billion over five years to boost funding for Indigenous mental health and drug treatment programs.

Reconciliation

Conservatives promise a plan to implement the TRC’s calls to action 71 through 76 — dealing with uncovering missing children and searching burial sites — and fund searches at all former residential schools for unmarked graves. They would also build a monument in Ottawa to honour residential school survivors and the children who were lost.
 

New Democrat Party

Indigenous services

New Democrats also pledge to lift all drinking water advisories immediately, not in 2026. They also say they will close the health gap in Indigenous communities and develop a First Nations justice and policing strategy while advancing Indigenous rights and self-determination.

Reconciliation

 The NDP has pledged to quickly appoint a special prosecutor to pursue accountability for crimes committed in residential schools, pursue those responsible for the abuse or deaths of children, and require churches and governments hand over all records. They’ve said they will end the government’s court battles against a Canadian Human Rights Tribunal ruling on compensation for Indigenous children who faced discrimination.

Bloc Québécois

Indigenous services

The Bloc wants to replace the Indian Act with a set of negotiated nation-to-nation treaties. The party is also proposing for an independent entity to replace the federal government’s comprehensive land claims resolution policy.

Reconciliation

Bloc Québécois Leader Yves-François Blanchet tabled a motion in the House of Commons in June calling for a national residential school monument in Ottawa and more funding for Indigenous communities to identify unmarked burial sites. It was adopted unanimously. The Bloc has also proposed more funding for the preservation of Indigenous languages, traditions and cultures, as well as more funding for Indigenous schools.

 

Green Party

Indigenous services

The Greens say they will end long-term boil-water advisories by investing in and upgrading infrastructure and ensure every Indigenous person has access to educational opportunities. “The Green Party of Canada is committed to Reconciliation, Nation-to-Nation engagement and self-determination for Indigenous Peoples,” states the party’s platform, which positions Indigenous people at the centre of a range of initiatives from everything from mental health to fishing and land-use practices.

Reconciliation

Greens say they would fund Indigenous healing centres to address the trauma of residential schools, and provide funding to work on missing children and unmarked burials. They would call on the Pope to apologize for the Catholic Church’s role in residential schools, improve First Nations child welfare, and end the government’s legal fight over the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal ruling.

 

People Party

Indigenous services

The People’s Party says it would “explore options to replace the paternalistic Indian Act” — which it says keeps “Indigenous peoples in a state of dependency” — with a new legal framework. The party says it would bring clean drinking water to remote First Nations communities. The party also promises to review federal spending on Indigenous programs to ensure they are better targeted to benefit the Indigeous population and those communities in greatest need.

Reconciliation

The People’s Party platform says that while the Canadian government committed many injustices against Indigenous peoples, “we cannot rewrite the past.” The party promises a relationship with Indigenous peoples based on mutual respect and respecting treaties. The party says it would also explore ways to “promote the establishment of individual property rights on reserves.” Although the party says it would reaffirm the federal government’s power to approve natural resources projects, it promises Indigenous communities would be adequately consulted and share in the benefits.

Emergency preparedness

Liberal Party

The Liberals launched a Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund in 2018 for infrastructure projects to support communities affected by natural disasters triggered by climate change. The spring budget included nearly $1.4 billion more for the fund over 12 years, and almost $2 billion over five years for Public Safety Canada to support provincial and territorial disaster response and recovery efforts. Liberals are promising to spend $500 million to train at least 1,000 firefighters “in targeted wildfire risk management strategies in communities across the country.”

Conservative

The Conservatives are promising to appoint a national disaster resilience adviser to the Privy Council Office and to invest in technology to “improve the early detection of wildfires and better predict their behaviour.” Tories promise to bring forth a national action plan on floods, which includes establishing a residential high risk flood insurance program, and a national climate adaptation strategy.

New Democrat Party

The NDP is promising to expand federal funding to respond to disasters and help communities adapt their infrastructure to withstand extreme weather, forest fires and floods. They promise to work with Indigenous communities to develop “coordinated action plans” to respond to climate-driven emergencies.

Bloc Québécois

The Bloc has pointed to forest fires and floods as proof that more must be done to slash greenhouse gas emissions.

Green Party

The Greens want to plant billions of fire-resistant trees and create fire breaks around at-risk, remote communities. They would also buy more water bombers to combat forest fires and map flood plains, tornado corridors “and other areas of natural vulnerability and adjust land use plans accordingly.” The party also proposes to rapidly scale up funding through the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund for municipal climate resilience projects, including wildfire mitigation activities, rehabilitation of storm water systems, and restoration of wetlands, shorelines, and other natural infrastructure.

People Party

The People’s Party promises to “invest in adaptation strategies if problems arise as a result of any natural climate change.”

International Affairs

Liberal Party

Foreign Policy

They say they plan to work with allies to respond to the behaviour of “authoritarian states” such as China, Russia and Iran, and develop a coordinated response on matters such as arbitrary detention and foreign interference in elections. The party says it would increase Canada’s international development assistance and donate 200 million vaccine doses to vulnerable populations abroad by the end of 2022.

Immigration & Refugees

The Liberals have pledged to resettle 40,000 Afghan refugees and to continue to support Afghans who did not get out of the country, although it has not offered details on how that would happen.

Amend the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act to give the minister the authority to help select permanent resident candidates who best meet the needs of the labour market. (source)

Eliminate citizen application process fees for permanent residents who have obtained the requisite criteria. (source, PBO analysis)

“Introduce electronic applications for family reunification.” (source)

Develop a digital platform to replace the Global Case Management System for the immigration system as of 2023, spending $428.9 million over five years. (source)

Fund migrant worker-centric programs and services, with $49.5 million over three years. (source)

Increase workplace inspections and ensure rights of temporary foreign workers are respected, spending $54.9 million over three years. (source)

 

Public safety & National security

Build two Arctic ice breakers—one in Quebec, one in B.C. —with at least one ship ready by 2030. (source)

Give $105.3 million over five years for Transport Canada to continue its work with partners for the Known Traveller Digital Identity pilot project. (source)

Top up the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund with $1.4 billion over 12 years, including $670 million for new small projects, and 10 per cent for Indigenous recipients. (source)

Complete flood maps for higher-risk areas with $63.8 million over three years (source)

Introduce touchless and automated interactions at the border, and modernize other procedures, including pre-clearance pilot projects in the United States.

Address sexual misconduct and gender-based violence in the Canadian Armed Forces with $236.2 million over five years, including free independent legal advice to victims. (source)

Modernize the North Warning System and NORAD. (source)

Maintain an additional six fighter aircraft and a frigate with the NATO Readiness Initiative, for $541.2 million over five years. (source)

 
 
 

Conservative

Foreign Policy

The Conservatives also promised to stand up to “China’s aggressions” with a “coalition of democracies,” and work with allies to address threats from China, Russia and Iran. It remains unclear how the Conservative policy would be different from the Liberal one. The Tories have promised an audit of all Canadian positions in multilateral institutions, including the UN, and say they will recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel and move Canada’s embassy there.

Immigration & Refugees

Conservatives have said they’d be open to resettling more than 20,000 Afghans.

Amend the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act to give the minister the authority to help select permanent resident candidates who best meet the needs of the labour market. (source)

Eliminate citizen application process fees for permanent residents who have obtained the requisite criteria. (source, PBO analysis)

“Introduce electronic applications for family reunification.” (source)

Develop a digital platform to replace the Global Case Management System for the immigration system as of 2023, spending $428.9 million over five years. (source)

Fund migrant worker-centric programs and services, with $49.5 million over three years. (source)

Increase workplace inspections and ensure rights of temporary foreign workers are respected, spending $54.9 million over three years

Public safety & National security

Double funding for the Security Infrastructure Program and allow funding to be used for a broader list of expenses, including paying security guards and training volunteers. (source)

Establish a permanent task force to address foreign interference that will address disinformation and influence operations. (source)

Pilot use of renewable fuels by Canadian Armed Forces (See Climate Change and Environment).(source)

Order a service-wide independent investigation into sexual misconduct, during which general and flag officer promotions and salary increases will be suspended. (source)

Ensure future sexual misconduct complaints are made to an external independent body outside the chain of command. (source)

Make the CAF/DND ombudsperson an independent officer of Parliament. (source)

Harmonize trade training in the Armed Forces with Red Seal Qualifications to allow skilled workers to transition easily to the civilian economy. (source)

Expand the Canadian Rangers in number and mandate; complete the Nanisivik Naval Facility on Baffin Island and develop a new Arctic naval base at Churchill, manitoba; deploy new autonomous vehicles for Arctic surveillance; launch low earth orbit satellites for telecommunications and Arctic defence. (source)

Expand Canada’s contributions to NATO missions in Latvia and the Baltic Sea; intensify the CAF training mission in Ukraine; create a NATO Centre of Excellence for Arctic Defence at the Resolute Bay CAF Training Centre; ensure active Canadian participation in NATO training missions and NATO Centres of Excellence in cybersecurity, strategic communications and energy security. (source)

 
 
 
 

New Democrat Party

Foreign Policy

Singh has also promised to work with allies to stand up to China. The party is backing a move to waive intellectual property rights to COVID vaccines so they can be produced in developing nations. The party is also promising to champion nuclear disarmament and peacekeeping, and boost foreign aid.

Immigration & Refugees

Party Leader Jagmeet Singh has been critical of the Liberal government’s handling of the evacuation in Kabul and has backed a group of individuals with family still trapped in Afghanistan that wants to make the evacuation an election issue.

End the cap on family reunification applications to sponsor parents and grandparents and reduce the backlogs there. (source)

Provide government regulation for the immigration consultant industry. (source)

Establish a clear and permanent path to resettlement for LGBTQI2S+ refugees to replace the current patchwork system that deals with emergency cases. (source)

Public safety & National security

Work with international allies and enhance real-time oversight of security services while respecting the Charter and privacy rights of Canadians in dealing with foreign interference and espionage, terrorism and cybercrime. (source)

Strengthen protection for Canadians who are victims of foreign interference and threats. (source)

Renew the priority on advancing multilateral peacekeeping around the world. (source)

Bring domestic search and rescue response times up to international standards and ensure they are capable of serving the needs of the North. (source)

Oppose the privatization of services on Canadian Armed Forces bases. (source)

Make mental health supports for military members and their families a priority. (source)

Implement the recommendations in the Deschamps Report on sexual harassment and assault in the military, including establishing independent oversight and accountability. (source)

 
 
 

Bloc Québécois

Foreign Policy

The Bloc has not released much details on where they’d like Canadian foreign policy to go. The party says it wants Canada to play a “leadership role” at the World Health Organization and for the province of Quebec to have more power to conduct its own international affairs.

 
 

Green Party

Foreign Policy

The Greens say their foreign policy approach will be “centred on the promotion of human security” as well as respect for the rule of law.  

Immigration & Refugees

It also says it will lead national and international debates to define what it means to be an “environmental refugee” and welcome “an appropriate share of the world’s environmental refugees into Canada.”

End the Safe Third Country Agreement with the United States regarding asylum seekers. (source)

Create better pathways to permanent residency for temporary foreign and frontline workers. (source)

Address the expense and bureaucratic delays involved in getting citizenship or residency. (source)

Public safety & National security

The party continues to call on Canada to sign and ratify the treaty to abolish nuclear weapons.

Implement the recommendations of the Deschamps report into sexual misconduct and harassment in the Canadian Armed Forces. (source)

Reassess Canada’s membership in NATO and other military alliances. (source)

 
 
 
 
 

People Party

Foreign Policy

The People’s Party says it would not get involved in foreign conflicts unless there is a “compelling strategic reason to do so.” It would also withdraw all commitments to the United Nations, liberalize trade with as many countries as possible and phase out billions of dollars in development aid, while focusing international assistance on humanitarian action for crises, conflicts and natural disasters.

  

 
 
 
 

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